Fix those missing source citations

It’s important to set aside time to update your family tree by adding source citations to information that does not have any.

If you have been researching for a long time or have not been conscientious about adding sources as you go, then you may have a lot of work to catch up on. To make this seemingly endless task achievable, you should break it into smaller chunks – perhaps one hour a week or fortnight. Don’t forget to measure your progress – seeing that number of missing source citations dropping is motivation to keep at it!

If you use family history software, you should be able to find a feature that tells you which information in your tree currently has no source citations attached. In Legacy, for example, under the Search tab select Find, then select Missing Sources. You can search for people who have no sources, or are missing source citations on one or more items. You can also narrow your search for people who are missing specific types of source citations, such as sources for the death date and place. Click on Create List to generate a list. You can work through the list from this interface, or click the Options button then select Print. That gives you the option of saving the list as a PDF or as a CSV file. I prefer the CSV format because I can open it in Excel and mark them off as I complete the citations.

If your tree is online with Ancestry, FamilySearch or another site, you will need to impose your own structure to work through your tree systematically adding source citations. One way to make it manageable might be to work on one surname at a time, starting from yourself and working backwards in time.

Of course not all sources are equal in quality and there is also the question of how many sources you need to cite, but those are issues for discussion at another time. One source is better than none, two independent sources are better, and if you find more then it’s time to celebrate.

Choose a method works for you and get stuck into it. The benefits are worth it!

Family history software helps your research

Some people do not use family history software and manage well without it, but there are a lot of benefits in using such software. Family history software provides a structure for storing your data and for recording the links between people, places, events and sources. In doing so, it helps you analyse the data and see patterns, gaps or inconsistencies.

The examples provided here are from the software which I use – Legacy Family Tree.

There are general patterns in families and Legacy notifies you if those patterns are broken. Here, for example, the red exclamation mark alerts me to the fact that there were five years separating the birth of two children, where the usual pattern is less than two years. I need to confirm whether there was another child or look for an alternative explanation.

LegacyPotentialProblem

Legacy has a standard list of potential problems and this can be handy for identifying where wrong conclusions may have been reached. My great great grandmother, for example, is reported on her 1931 death certificate as having been 101 years old. However, her last child was born in 1880 when the death certificate suggests she would have been aged 50. Although it is not unheard of to have a child at that age, it is enough evidence to make me suspect her supposed birth date.

LegacyPotentialProblemList

The Chronology view generates timelines which are another useful analytical tool.

LegacyChronologyextract.JPG

Changes in the location of events may highlight an error in your research or, in this case, indicate that a family moved around looking for coal mining and gold mining work. In another family, a discrepancy in the location of the births of children led me to conclude that one child had been included in that family by mistake.

These are just two of the many features of family history software that can help your research. I’ve only ever used one family history software program, so I cannot provide an opinion on which is best. From discussions with other genealogists I have come to the conclusion that they all do a great job. However, one thing that is great about Legacy Family Tree is that you can download a free version to try before you decide whether to buy it. It is for that reason that I usually recommend it to people who are just starting family history. The free version is completely functional, it just doesn’t have the fancier features activated.

If you haven’t tried using family history software yet, I would recommend that you do. If you already use it, learn more about the analytical tools it provides and you will not regret it.